The Naturalization Ceremonies in the U.S.

Updated on Tuesday 05th July 2016

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The Naturalization Ceremonies in the U.S. Image
An important phase of the naturalization process is represented by the naturalization ceremony in the U.S. This is a ceremony through which an applicant for the U.S. citizenship pledges an Oath of Allegiance to complete the naturalization process.

There are two types of naturalization ceremonies in the U.S.:

•    Effectuated in a judicial ceremony, in which a court directs the oath;
•    Effectuated in an administrative ceremony, in which the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) directs the oath.
 

Participation to the naturalization ceremony in the U.S.


An individual can take part in the naturalization ceremonies in the U.S. in the same day as the interview for naturalization. If however the ceremony is not available, the person in question will be sent a notification of the date, time and place of the scheduled naturalization ceremony by the USCIS.

If unable to attend the naturalization ceremony, the candidate should return the notification to his or her local USCIS office, together with a letter requiring a new date and explaining the reasons for which he or she cannot attend the scheduled ceremony. In case the candidate is not able to attend the naturalization ceremony more than once, this might lead to rejection of his or her application. A Miami immigration lawyer can provide more details on this matter.
 

The Oath of Allegiance in the U.S.


A naturalization applicant is able to become a citizen of the country only after he or she takes the Oath of Allegiance in the course of a naturalization ceremony in the U.S. After taking it, the candidate is handed the Certificate of Naturalization, which can be utilized as an evidence that he or she is a U.S. citizen. An immigration attorney in Miami can give you further information on this subject.
 

Registration for vote in Miami


The U.S. citizenship is granted with the right and responsibility of being able to vote in federal elections. After taking the Oath of Allegiance, the newly become U.S. citizen can register to vote. 

During administrative naturalization ceremonies in the U.S., a USCIS official, a state or local government election office or a non-governmental organization could distribute forms of registration for vote.

The naturalization candidate can also register to vote at other locations, like post offices, county boards of election and offices of his or her state Secretary of State.

 For more information, we invite you to contact our immigration lawyers in Miami.

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