Traveling Abroad as a U.S. Permanent Resident

Updated on Thursday 07th July 2016

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Traveling Abroad as a U.S. Permanent Resident Image
When traveling abroad as a U.S. permanent resident, besides the passport from his or her country of origin or the refugee travel document, the resident might be required to have supplementary entry or exit conditions, such as a visa, in the country where he or she is traveling to. 
 

Documents needed to reenter the U.S.


After traveling abroad as a U.S. permanent resident  for a short while, in order to reenter the U.S., the resident has to present a valid green card which has not expired and any other identity documents such as a passport, a foreign citizen I.D. card or a U.S. Driver’s License. 
 

How long is staying abroad permitted for a U.S. permanent resident?


Traveling abroad as a U.S. permanent resident is permitted freely, and a temporary or short travel does not influence the resident’s status. 

Commonly, short trips are allowed as long as the permanent resident can prove that he or she maintains the employment inside the U.S., as well as his or her connections with the U.S. family and community and filed the U.S. income taxes as a resident. Other factors can be taken into consideration in establishing the resident’s intention to live in the U.S. An immigration attorney in Miami can provide further details on what these factors consist of.

If, however, the relevant authorities determine that a permanent resident does not have the intention to live in the U.S. on a permanent basis, it will be considered that he or she has abandoned the permanent resident status. This might happen in cases when the permanent resident has not lived in the U.S. for an entire year. Abandonment might be also declared in cases when the resident traveled for less than one year and the authorities believe that he or she does not have the intention of settling in the U.S. 
 

Traveling abroad as a U.S. permanent resident for more than one year


If traveling abroad as a U.S. permanent resident for a trip longer than one year, it is recommended that the resident applies first for a reentry permit. Even though it does not guarantee the entry into the U.S. when he or she returns, the immigration legislation in Miami enables the permanent resident to apply for admission in the country as long as the reentry permit is valid without having to obtain a returning resident visa from the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the country of travel.

If you would like further information, please contact our immigration lawyers in Miami.

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