FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions about Immigration in Miami

Updated on Tuesday 02nd May 2017

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FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions about Immigration in Miami Image
Here are a few of the most frequently asked questions about immigration in Miami we come across from our clients.
 

What is a visa?


A visa is a photo i.d. granted outside of the U.S. borders that enables you to enter in the U.S. on a temporary or permanent basis. There are to main kinds of visas:

•    immigrant (permanent residency) visas, also named green cards, that enable you to live and work on for an indefinite period of time in the U.S.; and
•    non-immigrant visas, which enable you to live and/or work in the U.S. for a definite period of time

If you apply from inside the U.S., you might be granted a non-immigrant status, not a visa. Only a visa allows you to enter the U.S. For example, if you wanted to travel outside the U.S. with a valid status, you would have to reapply for a visa in order to enter into the country again. 
 

Is it possible to bring my family in the U.S.?


It is one of the most frequently asked questions about immigration in Miami. The answer is yes, most commonly by making a family based petition. This generally requires having a U.S. citizen or permanent resident relative who would be the petitioner in the case. Depending on who the relative and what the relationship is, the process might be shorter or longer.

Another option is an employer based petition, in which an existing or potential employer could make the petition on your behalf.

A temporary option could be a tourist visa, for which the member of your family applies at the U.S. Embassy in their country of origin. Our Miami immigration attorneys can give you more details on this subject.
 

How can I acquire a visa in the U.S.?


There are different means to acquire a U.S. visa, however the most common are by an employer sponsor based in the U.S. or a family member who is a citizen of the U.S. Most work visas necessitate that you have a firm job offer from a U.S. company before making the application. If you are a highly skilled worker, it might be easier for you to find a job in the U.S. than if you are an unskilled professional. If you are persecuted in your country, it might be possible to acquire refugee or temporary protected status. 
 

Years ago, I received a charge for a crime. Is it still possible for me to receive the U.S. citizenship?


Yes, however it depends on the kind of crime committed and how much time ago it was. If you have a criminal record, before applying for the citizenship you need to confer with an immigration lawyer in Miami to determine eligibility.
 

How can I obtain citizenship if I work in the U.S. army? 


It is possible for foreign persons to obtain the American citizenship if they are employed in the U.S. army. It is also important to know that the family members of the persons performing military services for the U.S. army can obtain the American citizenship

If you are employed in the U.S. army or in another similar institutions, such as the U.S. Navy or the National Guard, you will be required to apply for a visa at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), as long as you have been working in the American institution for minimum one year (during peacetime conditions). 
 

What happens if I abandon my residence in Miami, U.S.? 


Immigrants in USA who have received their Lawful Permanent Resident Status and who abandon their residence can lose this status if they have been living outside the country for an extended period of time. It is necessary to file a form at USCIS in the case in which the person decides to abandon the residence on a voluntarily basis
 

Am I required to pay taxes in USA if I have received a green card? 


Yes. Persons who are the recepient of a green card in Miami, U.S., have to pay taxes here. This means that you must file for tax returns at the Internal Revenue Services, following similar procedures applicable to American citizens

If you have more questions about immigration in Miami, please feel free to contact us.

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